The Rise of the Remote Workforce

remote-workforce-360x260We live in an emerging globalized mobile world of dispersed cloud workers. More than ever we see individuals and organizations trading in their traditional offices to work from home, coffee houses and just about anywhere in the world in which they can connect to the Internet. Leading the 21st century dispersed workforce brings its own challenges and requires new attitudes, approaches, and technologies. It requires leadership that is willing to step out of the comfort of the corner office and explore rich new possibilities of workforce engagement. It requires a higher degree of understanding communication, culture, collaboration, and empowerment.

“We live in a time of unprecedented globalism. Businesses, people, and economies are tied together in ways we could not have imagined 40 years ago. Organizations must now compete within a global landscape where clients and even the workforce are culturally diverse and geographically dispersed. Organizations are networked and interlaced around the globe through the Internet and mobile technologies. Crossing and operating within cultural boundaries must­­­ become a skill of the leaders and followers of the future. Organizations of the future must become culturally literate if they are to successfully compete under these emerging paradigms.” – Philip A Foster, The Open Organization, 2014

As we witness the emergence of a globalized mobile world of dispersed cloud workers, more than ever we see individuals and organizations trading in the traditional offices for the coffee house office or what I like to call the Coffice. A cloud based workforce is nothing more than a distributed or remote employee who is not bound by geography, time zone, or national boundaries. These employees are connected to colleagues via technology and therefore are able to work more flexibly via the internet.

Leader flexibility is the key to creating an atmosphere where each employee can become more excited about where they work and more importantly what they are working on. As the world becomes more globalized, the need for a flexible cloud optimized workforce is more evident. With a remote workforce comes the need to re-imagine and retool leadership for the remote worker. What is certain is that the way we approach and engage leaders and followers is quickly changing. There are challenges ahead as we assimilate into the new realities of a distributed cloud based workforce. Leading the charge for change is and will continue to be our Millennials. By the year 2025, it is estimated that nearly 75% of all work will be held by this generation. What is certain – change will happen whether we embrace it or not. As the 21st century organization continues to seek greater flexibility, organizational leadership must also evolve to the pressures and realities of a globalized economy.

While traditional leadership relies on formality, power, and proximity to followers; the Organization of the 21st century is emerging as a nontraditional structure in which authority is not vested in positions and human capital is dispersed geographically. Organizations will begin to abandon traditional leadership pedagogue for leaderless, self-led, and an empowered autonomous workforce. As hierarchies begin to collapse, leaders must learn to adapt to new realities and what it means to lead a more culturally diverse dispersed workforce from a distance.

As our reality shifts, leaders must learn how to communicate more effectively; engage human capital differently; embrace cultural nuances with diplomatic precision; and empower employees. The shift toward a dispersed workforce requires confidence and an abandonment of old models of employee engagement. The new way of working is not for everyone.  These changes will require discernment in the on-boarding process. Because Communication is so different in the dispersed setting, employees must leave ego behind and walk with assurance that they questions are important enough to ask.

Things are shifting – organizations are changing. Engagement of employees will change. We can either prepare for the inevitable or bury our heads in the depths of a 19th century hierarchical structure. In the end, you can change or you can become irrelevant. The choice is up to you.

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 Dr. Philip A. Foster is considered a Thought Leader in Business Operations, Organization and Strategic Leadership. He is a prolific writer, International Lecturer and Best Selling Author of “The Open Organization” – now available through Ashgate Publishing. Philip is certified in both Leadership and coaching. He is the Founder and CEO of Maximum Change Consulting, serving clients from around the world. He holds a Doctorate in Strategic Leadership with emphasis in Strategic Foresight and a Master of Art in Organizational Leadership, both from Regent University, Virginia.

Twitter: @maximumchange, E-mail: philip@maximumchange.com.

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No More Employees

11_LargeOpenSpaceIt would seem strange to concern ourselves with the labor participation rate 20 years from now. However, as a practitioner of Strategic Foresight, it is just as important to examine the here and now as it is to explore the trends for the future. This creates a textured picture of what the future may hold and it helps organizations navigate potential disruptions in their future. These disruptions could have an adverse effect on whether an organization is able to reach their preferred future. There is more to an examination of labor than how it may or may not affect industry. The flip side to these discussions is in how it may or may not affect labor itself. I’ve written several blogs on the subject of the manager-less organization of the future. In doing so, I’ve had to consider the complete texture of a potential future. Asking “What if” to explore the potentials of the future we are able to imagine disruptions with depth and certain context.

WHAT IF there were fewer employees in the future? What would that look like? What would that mean to industry, education and the economy? These are serious question worth the exploration. In my previous writings I’ve explored the trends which may create pressure on a future workforce. One particular trend that caught my eye is the result of a prediction I read. In 1989 it was predicted that by the year 2000 there would be less than 50% in full time employment. In 2011, I read a Gallup poll that indicated this number was actually closer to 45% in full time employment.

Playing these trends out another 20 years, we can begin to imagine the year 2034 as it relates to labor. Assuming a trend in which full time employment is 35%, we will find slightly over 128 million individuals employed full time. Considering a near 366 million population in 2034, that leaves over 192 million individuals in part-time, less than full-time or not in the workforce at all.

This is a lot of meat to consume. The bottom line, we will have a whopping 65% of individuals in part time, less than part time or unemployed. What does this mean for industry and what does it mean for labor itself? For industry, it means that they are going to have to do more with less. Technology will play a key role in the organization of the future. From the Internet of everything to automated processes, we are going to see technology continued to grow and influence our future. This will likely mean that the geographic footprint of corporate offices will decrease. In the technology field alone, developers are creating artificial intelligence that can write mundane coding assignments. Software automation is already developing so that it can anticipate how to respond to social media posts. We are looking at a future in which calling a company and expecting to speak to a human will be diminished. We will have more automated attendants and processes to interact with Artificial Intelligence. The manufacturing sector will likely continue to see an increase in automation of mundane tasks as they also drop to a just in time manufacturing within a smaller factory footprint. The advent and improvement of 3 dimensional printing with bring manufacturing of day-to-day objects into the home, making consumers makers.

How will this play out for labor itself? A larger number of individuals will enter into contract, part-time and self-employment. Individuals will begin to form powerful alliances with complementary products and services.  Individuals will no longer be required to travel to a central office to work. Cloud based connections and remote working with be the norm in 20 years. These changes will require more skilled labor than ever before. The future can be viewed as that of a cerebral economy in which labor is more educated and skilled than in previous decades. The workforce is seen as knowledge workers. Geographical boundaries of work related to country of origin will collapse giving rise to a new understanding of the global economy. While governments remain intact, workers will know no boundaries.

A labor shift of this magnitude has many implications. Individuals will need generalist skills in a given industry as well as a deep understanding of technology. This will require access to high speed Internet and other technologies. While there is no guarantee that any of this will come to be; we do know that the trends are moving toward such realities. The question: how will society and organizations deal with a future much different than the one we have today?

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PIC3Dr. Philip A Foster is considered a Thought Leader in Business Operations, Organization and Strategic Leadership. He is a prolific writer, published author and lectures internationally. His most recent e-book “Organization 3.0 – The Evolution of Leadership and Organizational Theories Toward an Open System for the 21st Century” is available exclusively on Amazon.  Philip is certified in both Leadership and coaching and serves as Adjunct professor at Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN. He is the Founder and CEO of Maximum Change Leadership and Business Consulting, serving clients from around the world. He is a Doctor of Strategic Leadership with emphasis in Strategic Foresight and holds a Master of Art in Organizational Leadership, both from Regent University, Virginia. He can be reached at philip@maximumchange.com or (615)216-5667.

The Decay of American Sovereignty through Globalization

Globalization is the phenomenon that polarizes people, alters the fabric of our lives and creates rifts within and between people (Harf and Lombardi, 2009, p 258). Many in the West have embraced globalization and argue that it helps to streamline economic systems, disciplines labor and management, brings forth new technologies and ideas, and fuels economic growth (Harf and Lombardi, 2009, p 258). Yet, many poor and middle-class workers view globalization as an economic and cultural wave that will tear the fabric of their societies (Harf and Lomardi, 2009, p 258).

 

Beyond the cultural fissures, we must consider the impact of globalization on a country’s sovereignty. In fact, James M. Boyers (1998) states “Globalization ‘denotes a process of denationalization of clusters of political, economic, and social activities’” (p 583). While the U.S. Constitution serves as the foundation and source of legitimacy for the U.S. Government; globalizing forces will continue to require the United States to face new challenges and the Constitution will limit the means of meeting those challenges (Boyers, 1998, p 598).

 

Arguably, globalization creates pressures for greater inequality throughout the world and nowhere is this felt more than in the United States because our system fails to redistribute income effectively and allow the pressures of globalization to be fully realized (Massey, 2009, p 9). All countries compete in the same global economy and face the same market conditions, but the United States is unique among advanced nations in its ability to generate inequality (Massey, 2009, p 10). Massey (2009) argues that this “hyper-inequality emerged not through globalization, technological change, or market segmentation, but because of institutional arrangements specific to the United States that fail to redistribute income to the same extent as other industrial nations” (p 10). These institutional arrangements are rooted in the Constitution of the United States which in part establishes “Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty” to all Americans (U.S. Constitution). The Constitution solidifies the Declaration of Independence which promotes the ideal that “all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness” (The Declaration of Independence, 1776). Globalization appears to dictate, amongst other things, the edict of redistribution of wealth which is in stark contrast to our ideals of Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness. While Globalization is worthy of participation from an economic standard, the precedent set in changing laws to conform to international standards can threaten the very fabric of our Constitutional DNA and if not monitored could eventually unravel the very nature of what makes the United States so unique.

References:

Harf, James E. and Lombardi, Mark Owen (2010). Taking Sides. Clashing Views on Global Issues. New York, NY: McGraw Hill.

Boyers, James M (1998). “Globalization and the United States Constitution: How Much Can it Accommodate” Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies. Volume 5, Issue 2, Article 11, pp 583-599.

Massey, Douglas S. (2009). “Globalization and Inequality: Explaining American Exceptionalism.” European Sociological Review. Volume 25, Number 1, 2009, p 9-23.

United States Government (n.d.) The Constitution of the United States. Retrieved on November 1, 2012 from http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/constitution_transcript.html

United States Government (1776). The Declaration of Independence. Retrieved on November 1, 2012 from http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/declaration_transcript.html

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Philip A Foster, MA is Founder/CEO of Maximum Change Inc. Maximum Change, Inc. is a Leadership and Business Consulting firm located in Middle Tennessee offering business & leadership consulting, speaking and training. Philip Foster is a Thought Leader in Business Operations, Organization, Strategic Leadership, Planning and Strategic Foresight. Facilitating change through the design and implementation of strategies, strategic foresight and strategic planning

Email | LinkedIn | Facebook | Twitter | Web | Skype: philip.a.foster | 615-216-5667

Shame Leadership – Communicating Across Cultural Boundaries

Understanding culture and its values aids the communicator in dealing with conflict resolution. Elmer (1993) posits there are ways we can be more culturally sensitive in handling conflict (p 46). The goal of conflict resolution within a given culture is to understand that everyone has a vested interest and those who gain awareness and understanding of such interest can creatively manage the situation as to protect the dignity of those involved (Elmer, 1993, p 59). Understanding values helps the communicator understand why a culture will attempt to preserve itself when threatened (Foster, 2012). Cultural barriers in language restrict the communicator’s ability to listen, understand and approach the culture with sensitivity to those who operate within the culture (Foster, 2012). Such disconnect may hinder any emotional connection with those within the culture (Black et al., 1999, p 120). While Westerners prefer and default to a more direct approach to communication without taking it personal, shame based cultures prefer more indirect approaches to conflict. Individuals are not singled and problems are seen as a communal affair (Elmer, 1993, p 46). While language in North America supports directness and holds some distinct advantages, such language might alienate those within a more indirect culture (Elmer, 1993, p 46). Elmer (1993) argues most people see directness in communication as crude, harsh, uncultured and certainly disrespectful if not cruel (p 50). Global leaders grow to understand that forcing someone to change from their cultural experience means the leader is avoiding their own awkwardness of changing and thus expecting someone to be more like them (Elmer, 1993, p 53). Global leadership understand that each individual has a vested interest and how they protect the dignity of those within the culture builds openness and trust in the relationship the leader has with his followers (Elmer, 1993, p 59).

References:

 

Elmer, Duane (1993). Cross-Cultural Conflict. Building Relationships for Effective Ministry. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press.

 

Foster, Philip (2012). Retrieved from his posting: Blackboard Dialogues for Doctorate in Strategic Leadership, Regent University, Virginia Beach, VA.

 

Black, J.S., Morrison, A.J. and Gregersen, H.B. (1999). Global Explorers. The Next Generation of Leaders. New York, NY: Routledge.

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Philip A Foster, MA is Founder/CEO of Maximum Change Inc. Elevating leaders and their organizations to the next level since 2005. Master Certified Coach, Philip A Foster, MA and his associates facilitate effective positive change by helping organizations, leaders and individuals in high demand — design and implement strategies that maximize focus and deliver results. Specializing in Organization and Strategic Leadership.

Email | LinkedIn | Facebook | Twitter | Web | Skype: philip.a.foster | 615-216-5667

Developing the Key Attributes of Global Leadership: An Ideological Texture Analysis of the Book of Titus.

By Philip A Foster, MA

Global Leadership

Understanding and developing attributes of global leadership are likely one of the clearest paths to success for leaders operating within a global context. Literature defines culture as a filter or lens by which we base decisions and actions (Mintzberg et al., 2005, p 169). Organizational expansion across cultural, political, economic and social boundaries creates certain obstacles and challenges which must be overcome by leaders today. Considering how we view the world is helpful when we begin to understand the world is viewed differently by others (Foster, 2012). Literature reveals many clues as to how leaders should view their organization. When a leader begins to adjust their filters and lenses to include other cultural attributes they view the system from a wider perspective and thereby become more of a global leader (Foster, 2012). Any attempt to force entry into another culture without adherence to laws, language, pace, politics, decisions making approaches and the cultures concepts of authority become detrimental to an ability to operate within the context of that environment (Branch, 2012).

A global leader is one who lives in the context of structural indeterminacy which states that no single structure is the answer when dealing with complex business models that must respond to cross-border business opportunities, demands for local citizenship, and cross-border/cross-business purchasing or technology efficiencies (Galbraith, 2000, p 2-3). The church in Crete was certainly a complex model of differing opinions, culture and religious thinking which required a clear mission and vision by its leadership.

When we consider Boissevain’s Taxonomy of Relation to Groups to analyze the Book of Titus we can begin to argue that the church in Crete was a “corporate group or body with a permanent existence; a collection of people recruited on recognized principles, with common interests and rules (norms) fixing rights and duties of the members in relation to one another and to these interests” (Robbins, 1996, p 101). The Apostle Paul would have understood that the Christian Church in Crete, as a corporate group, would present specific challenges to the leadership. As evidenced in Titus 1:5-9, Paul may have known that when he departed Crete a leadership vacuum might develop which could devastate the church (NASB, 2000, p 2147).

Titus 1:5-9  “For this reason I left you in Crete, that you would set in order what remains and appoint elders in every city as I directed you,  namely, if any man is above reproach, the husband of one wife, having children who believe, not accused of dissipation or rebellion. For the overseer must be above reproach as God’s steward, not self-willed, not quick-tempered, not addicted to wine, not pugnacious, not fond of sordid gain, but hospitable, loving what is good, sensible, just, devout, self-controlled, holding fast the faithful word which is in accordance with the teaching, so that he will be able both to exhort in sound doctrine and to refute those who contradict” (NASB, 2000, p 2148).

Paul knew the church had grown dependent on him and his skill, style, and personality (NASB, 2000, p 2147). Such dependency could cause subordinates to flounder and even vie for control over the church once he departed (NASB, 2000, p 2147). Paul knew that he would not be there to continue to build, encourage, discipline and teach so he trained young pastors to assume leadership positions after he was gone. Global leaders should heed this example as to what could happen without proper training, mentoring and accountability of subordinate leaders.

Such a power play is evident in Titus 1:10 where Paul appears to understand diverging worldviews which create a filter of complexity within the church. He warns the leaders that some will try to preserve parts of their culture through what Sire (1997) called cultural relativism (p 87).

Titus 1:10 “For there are many rebellious men, empty talkers and deceivers, especially those of the circumcision” (NASB, 2000, p 2149).

Such a worldview brought about confusion through the argument of circumcision, which caused disunity in the church. Understanding the given ideology of the corporate group in Crete, we can begin to make sense of the arguments of circumcision. Robbins (1996) argues that a person’s ideology provides certain presuppositions, dispositions, and values held in common with other people within a given group (p 95). Such ideology integrates a system of beliefs, assumptions, and values that reflect the needs and interests of the group (Robbins, 1996, p 96).

These presuppositions, dispositions and values many times made it difficult for the Apostles. Titus 1:11 Paul knew the ideology he was up against and therefore instructed the leaders to silence those who were preaching circumcision “because they are upsetting whole families, teaching things they should not teach for the sake of sordid gain” (NASB, 2000, p 2149).  A global leader is one who makes difficult decisions with care to explain his rationale and backs it with the authority and trust bestowed on him by his followers.

Attributes of Leadership

A global leader is one who maintains organizational ties both personally and professionally to validate the followers need to be valued and heard (Janiak, 2012). Developing a personal tie with someone requires trust and understanding. Trust is born out of specific attributes of leadership exemplified by the Apostle Paul in Titus 1:6-9. These attributes are beneficial to any organization.

Titus 1:6-9 “Likewise urge the young men to be sensible;  in all things show yourself to be an example of good deeds, with purity in doctrine, dignified,  sound in speech which is beyond reproach, so that the opponent will be put to shame, having nothing bad to say about us. Urge bondslaves to be subject to their own masters in everything, to be well-pleasing, not argumentative” (NASB, 2000, p 2148).

The attributes of a leader include: being above reproach, not self-willed, not quick-tempered, nor addicted to substances, nor fond of selfish gain (NASB, 2000, p 2148). Considering Titus 1:8, a global leader should be hospitable, loving what is good, sensible, just, devout, and self-controlled (NASB, 2000, p 2149). One would note that most of these qualifications focus on character rather than knowledge or skill (NASB, 2000, p 2149). Leaders often find that they are closely watched and scrutinized. These personal attributes provide a window to one’s character and create qualifications that can be used to evaluate a person for a position of leadership within an organization (NASB, 2000, p 2149).

As Black, Morrison, and Gregersen (1999) argue, trust is a critical issue in global organizations (p 124). Trust is built in the followers when a global leader is subject to rulers, to authorities, obedient, ready to serve, maligns no one, is peaceable, gentle and showing consideration for all men and women (NASB, 2000, p 2151). Further a global leader should avoid foolish controversies, strife and disputes (NASB, 2000, p 2152).

Stagich (2001) argues that a leader’s success depends greatly on the more intrinsic, self-sustaining principles of synergy and how well we facilitate it to achieve goals (p 21). Culture remains complex because it is essentially composed of individual interpretations of the world and the activities and artifacts that reflect these interpretations (Mintzberg, et al., 2005, p 265). When interpreting how to connect with others we should develop relationships in advance of any business transactions (Foster, 2012).  Zweifel (2003) argues that leaders must learn to respect cultural pathways (p 25) and must put themselves in the shoes of those in other cultures (p 26). A step toward connecting with other cultures relies on how well the leader develops an understanding of the culture for which they will operate (Foster, 2012). The Apostle Paul understood the cultural attributes of the church in Crete and would have developed a close enough relationship to have spoken on authority of what needed to be done. He would have further understood the dynamics of self-sustaining principles and would have sought to develop synergy focused on the achieving the goals of the Christian Church.

The Apostle Paul understood the need to empower those he placed in leadership position. When a leader empowers their followers, they clearly do not abdicate the role of leadership but simply allow their followers to operate within their giftedness and training with the organizations vision and purpose always in mind (Foster, 2012).

Conclusion

A global leader is one who is closely watched, scrutinized and evaluated by the culture in which they operate. A global leader must develop personal relationships and trust to best lead within the context of a differing culture. The Pauline attributes of leadership as presented in Titus are arguably universal keys to leading across cultural boundaries. While culture remains a complex issue and interpretations of the world will vary, one attribute seems to transcend all others; that of trust and understanding. The Apostle Paul was greatly trusted by those in Crete and his authority remained long after his physical departure. His ability to mentor and instruct his leaders from afar was a clear indication of the trust he had developed during his time there. A global leader, like Paul will develop this trust as well as the ability to develop synergy that facilitates the achievement of organizational goals.

References

Mintzberg, Henry; Ahlstrand, Bruce and Lampel, Joseph (2005). Strategy Safari. New York, NY: Free Press.

Foster, Philip (2012). Retrieved from his posting: Blackboard Dialogues for Doctorate in Strategic Leadership, Regent University, Virginia Beach, VA.

Branch, Chester (2012). Retrieved from his posting: Blackboard Dialogues for Doctorate in Strategic Leadership, Regent University, Virginia Beach, VA.

Galbraith, Jay R. (2000). Designing the Global Corporation. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Robbins, Vernon K. (1996). Exploring the Texture of Texts. Harrisburg, PA: Trinity Press International.

NASB (2000). Life Application Study Bible. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan.

Sire, James W. (1997). The Universe Next Door. Madison, WI: InterVarsity Press.

Janiak, Becca (2012). Retrieved from her posting: Blackboard Dialogues for Doctorate in Strategic Leadership, Regent University, Virginia Beach, VA.

Black, J. Stewart, Morrison, Allen J., Gregersen, Hal B. (1999). Global Explorers. The Next Generation of Leaders. New York, NY: Routledge.

Stagich, Timothy (2001). Collaborative Leadership and Global Transformation.  Miami Beach, Florida: Global Leadership Resources.

Zweifel, Thomas D (2003). Culture Clash – Managing the Global High-Performance Team. New York, NY: SelectBooks.

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Philip A Foster, MA is Founder/CEO of Maximum Change Inc. Elevating leaders and their organizations to the next level since 2005. Master Certified Coach, Philip A Foster, MA and his associates facilitate effective positive change by helping organizations, leaders and individuals in high demand — design and implement strategies that maximize focus and deliver results. Specializing in Organization and Strategic Leadership.

Email | LinkedIn | Facebook | Twitter | Web | Skype: philip.a.foster | 615-216-5667

Relationships are the new wealth of the global economy.

Literature reveals certain barriers to consider in cross-cultural communication. Zweifel (2003) reminds us a global leader already understands the dynamics of language as the very reflection of the culture in which the organization operates (p 25). English is consider the language of business with more than 1 billion people in over 100 countries speaking it as either a first or second language (Marquardt & Berger, 2000, p 4). More specifically English, according to Marquardt and Berger (2000), has become the global language of media and computer and carriers certain cultural and social values (p 4). Culturally and socially holding a common language aids in the development of lasting friendships and trust within the context of differing cultures (Foster, 2012).

Barriers exist when individuals are not able to effectively communicate wants, needs and desires to one another. A global leader must be able to communicate and build the organizations vision (Marquardt & Berger, 2000, p 31). When individuals do not speak and understand a common language, it becomes difficult to get people to comprehend the vision (Marquardt & Berger, 2000, p 31). While speaking in a common language creates its own challenges, the ability to listen for verbal and social cues in a foreign language becomes a greater challenge. Literature argues that there is great value in attentive listening (Marquardt & Berger, 2000, p 43). When an individual does not understand a given language, a barrier is instantly erected.

Creating trust within teams is essential to the success of any organization (Marquardt & Berger, 2000, p 48). Literature argues that our natural impulse is to homogenize everything rather than relish diversity and learn from it (Marquardt & Berger, 2000, p 50). Breaking down barriers is about human relationships and how they are developed through understanding of languages and culture.

References

Zweifel, Thomas D (2003). Culture Clash – Managing the Global High-Performance Team. New York, NY: SelectBooks.

 

Marquardt, Michael J. and Berger, Nancy O. (2000). Global Leaders for the 21st Century. Albany, NY: New York Press.

 

Foster, Philip A. (2012). Retrieved from his posting: Blackboard Dialogues for Doctorate in Strategic Leadership, Regent University, Virginia Beach, VA.

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Philip A Foster, MA is Founder/CEO of Maximum Change Inc. Elevating leaders and their organizations to the next level since 2005. Master Certified Coach, Philip A Foster, MA and his associates facilitate effective positive change by helping organizations, leaders and individuals in high demand — design and implement strategies that maximize focus and deliver results. Specializing in Organization and Strategic Leadership.

Email | LinkedIn | Facebook | Twitter | Web | Skype: philip.a.foster | 615-216-5667

I am a Global Leader…Mi fiel amigo y socio en los negocios [My loyal friend and business associate]

Geography, language, customs, values, traditions, laws, ethics, and national psychology are all considerations to whether someone is a global leader. Based on the reading, I would feel comfortable considering myself a global leader in context of the Caribbean and Latin America. With regard to other countries I would consider myself a global explorer as defined in Black, Morrison, and Gregersen (1999) Global Explorer as someone who is open to new experiences and understands that they don’t know what they don’t know (p. 54).

 

Having grown up in a predominantly Hispanic community in southern Florida, I have an understanding of many customs, values, traditions and language of the Latin community. I consider Black, et.al, (1999) encouragement to create an emotional connection with the people through sincere interests and skillful listening (p 121). This is done through an understanding of their psychology as it relates to views on time and relationships (Rosen, 2000, p 45). For example, Time is more fluid in the Latin culture with punctuality more forgiving than their American counterparts. They are also keen on loyalty in their relationships of friends and family.

 

My experience with Latin culture begins and ends with food. Many important meetings I’ve attended have revolved around Cuban Coffee and other Latin Cuisine. Once trust is secured, my Latin colleagues have been the most loyal friends and business partners I have ever had. In my experience It has always been about building trust that creates a lasting loyalty.

 

References:

Black, J.S., Morrison, A.J. and Gregersen, H.B. (1999). Global Explorers. The Next Generation of Leaders. New York, NY: Routledge.

Rosen, Robert (2000). Global Literacies. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster.

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Philip A Foster, MA is Founder/CEO of Maximum Change Inc. Elevating leaders and their organizations to the next level since 2005. Master Certified Coach, Philip A Foster, MA and his associates facilitate effective positive change by helping organizations, leaders and individuals in high demand — design and implement strategies that maximize focus and deliver results. Specializing in Organization and Strategic Leadership.

Email | LinkedIn | Facebook | Twitter | Web | Skype: philip.a.foster | 615-216-5667